District judges (magistrates' courts)

They hear criminal cases, youth cases and some civil cases in the magistrates' court.

They hear criminal cases, youth cases and some civil cases in the magistrates' court and deal with the longer and more involved cases. They may also hear cases in the Family Proceedings Courts or deal with extradition proceedings and terrorist cases. Unlike magistrates who sit as a bench of three, District judges (Magistrates' Court) usually sit alone but, like magistrates, they are Justices of the Peace.

They are appointed by the Queen on the Lord Chancellor's recommendation following a fair and open competition administered by the Judicial Appointment Commission. They will have a seven-year right of audience in relation to all proceedings in any part of the Supreme Court, or all proceedings in county courts or magistrates' courts. They will also have served as Deputy District judges (Magistrates' Courts) for at least two years or 30 days' sittings.

When in court they do not usually wear robes.

All judges, when they are sworn in, must take two oaths/affirmations. The first is the oath of allegiance and the second the judicial oath; these are collectively referred to as the judicial oath.

Oaths

Judiciary

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